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  1. #1
    Editor in Chief dgstorm's Avatar
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    Nexus 4 Review Compilation


    Here's a handy-dandy review compilation for you guys to check out on the Google Nexus 4. Overall, the feedback on the device is very positive. It's hard not to be tempted by an unlocked high-end device with a slew of cool features. For the most part the biggest complaint about the device was the lack of LTE, although this is less of an issue throughout the international markets. The other obvious complaint was the lack of a microSD slot, but again, this depends on the needs of the user. For specifics, here is a list of summations on the device with links to their respective articles:

    Engadget - Engadget had their typical solid and thorough writeup which included benchmarks, pics and video.
    The idea that a Nexus quad-core smartphone is hitting the market with a starting price one dollar shy of $300 is simply stunning. Even more so is that it's available without any contract or carrier locks, which means you can use it virtually anywhere in the world. Adding yet another layer of amazement is the fact that this particular device will always be among the first (if not the first) to get the latest version of Android for the foreseeable future. What once was a smartphone series designed for developers has been decked out with top-notch features and priced so attractively that consumers will take notice of it; there's nothing comparable that comes close to it in that price range. This is a smartphone that we'd normally expect to be much more expensive unlocked, but Google set a precedent by lowering the cost of the Galaxy Nexus, keeping the Nexus 7 at $200 and is now continuing the trend with the Nexus 4. The price of freedom has never been more reasonable.

    Sure, the Nexus 4 is not without its hiccups, but none of its predecessors have been perfect, either. And given the boost in real-world performance, the better camera and various other new features, it's even more tempting than all those previous devices whose shoes it's trying to fill. In a case like this... you have our permission not to resist.
    The Verge - The Verge offered up an engaging and enjoyable to read review. It was just the right length and includes some very detailed statistics at the end.
    The Nexus 4 is absolutely wonderful, but it's also vexing. Frustrating. Annoying. It's easily the best Android phone on the market right now, and has some of the most powerful software that's ever been put on a mobile phone. It's an upgrade from last year's Galaxy Nexus in every way. It's terrific ó save for one small thing.

    In the US, a flagship phone without LTE is like a muscle car with no wheels. For other networks in other countries, and for the lucky T-Mobile customers out there that are getting great speeds on its HSPA+ network ó great. No problem. Go get this phone. But for others ó many others ó it's hard to imagine buying this device when you know it's a generation behind in terms of network technology.

    A little over a year ago, I bristled at the fact that the iPhone 4S didn't have LTE, but I also admitted that the phone was a still a "force to be reckoned with." The same can be said for the Nexus 4, with a caveat. The mobile industry has changed a lot in the last 12 months. LTE is the norm, not a nice-to-have, and its performance has shown the cracks in the aging GSM networks of the US. No flagship device is released without it. Not even the iPhone.

    For a phone and an OS built for the cloud, I think it's unacceptable to not offer a version that takes advantage of our fastest mobile networks.

    If you buy the Nexus 4, you have to decide whether you're willing to compromise data speeds for the purest and best form of the Android OS. After comparing the options and seeing the gulf between Google's flagship and other devices on the market, I've decided it's a compromise I won't be making again.
    TechRadar - TechRadar's was extremely long, clocking in at 12 pages! Of course, with this amount of length you would expect enormous detail and thoroughness, and they do not disappoint. If you want to read the most detailed report on the Nexus 4, then this is the place to start.
    Giving a handset on TechRadar a full five star rating is almost impossible. You could have the best phone in the world that can solve famine, pick the kids up from school and decipher Mandarin Chinese in a millisecond.
    But it's not just about specs Ė value plays a huge part to play. A five star rating is reserved for a phone that we would say you should go out and buy pronto. Right now. Immediately.
    The Nexus 4 comes SO close to that, it's unreal. This phone has some of the best specs around but it's not just great value, it's fantastic value. Almost too good to be true.
    Had it not been crippled by silly things like a paltry memory allowance and not-quite-there camera, we'd have recommended it immediately and given it a five star rating. Alas, it's fallen just short of that.
    But make no mistake Ė this is the best Nexus handset so far by a long shot. We love it and can't recommend it highly enough. It could seriously be a contender for our best smartphone of 2012. If you're due a new phone, you should check the Google Nexus 4 out without delay.
    TechCrunch - The folks over at Techcrunch understand the value of brevity and get straight to the point on their Nexus 4 article. This is a shorter one, and probably doesn't pack as much detail as some of the others, yet their writeup still includes very meaty content and valuable insights.
    The Nexus 4 is a device that tickles me on many levels ó itís got a class-leading spec sheet, itís completely unlocked, and as far as devices sold without contracts go itís pretty damned cheap. More simply put, itís the sort of device thatís designed to kick my salivary glands into action and it certainly succeeds on that front. The real question though is whether or not the Nexus 4 will have the same effect on you, and that Iím not too sure about.

    See, thereís no question that Google has been retooling its Nexus brand to be more consumer-oriented ó devices like the popular Nexus 7 and the curious Nexus Q (while it was alive, anyway) were proof of that. Even so, the Nexus 4 still seems like a device thatís best appreciated by Android purists. As much as I like living, playing, and working with an untouched version of Android, there are other (yes, manufacturer-customized) devices out there that pack more in terms of creature comforts and general consumer friendliness.

    If youíre an Android enthusiast, a tinkerer, someone who hates signing multi-year contracts for high-end hardware, or just enjoy experiencing the bleeding edge, you really canít buy this thing fast enough. Thatís not to say that absolutely no one else will enjoy this thing ó thereís a whole lot to like about the Nexus 4 ó but those of you who donít fall into one of those camps may be better served by a different device.
    ComputerWorld - Computerworld's review was a solid three pages, and had some useful perspectives. We especially liked how detailed they were with their discussion of Android 4.2.
    Google's Nexus 4 offers the best overall user experience you'll find on Android -- and arguably any mobile platform -- today. Its unadulterated Google Android 4.2 software combined with a spectacular display, outstanding performance, excellent camera and inspired design make for a compelling package that shows just how good Android can be.

    The Nexus 4 does, however, demand some compromises. The phone has a low amount of internal storage with no option to add an SD card. Its glass encasing, while visually appealing, raises the risk of damage to the device. The phone's battery isn't easily removable, and its unlocked GSM/HSPA+ configuration means it won't work with LTE-based networks.

    If you can live with those limitations, the Nexus 4 can give you an unmatched Android experience at a tremendous value -- and without the carrier lock-in most similarly priced smartphones require.
    Sound off in the forums what you think of the next Nexus smartphone.

  2. #2
    Administrator Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Google decision to exclude LTE was based on the individual carrier specs for LTE and various US Government approvals. Google would have had to spec different radios which would increase the manufacturing cost of the N4. They also decided to concentrate on the more lucrative international market where LTE is not a requirement for the average user. LTE coverage in the international market covers less then 20 of the user population.
    As for the SD. Google is banking on more users using cloud storage. This in-turn allows Google to keep the price of the hardware down.

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